In January 2022 SNAP will present Recognition & Repetition in the Artists’ Studio, the third and final installment of Professional Practice Seminar: Printmaking In the Expanded Field. 

For this final Professional Development Seminar SNAP has engaged three lead Artists, Miguel A. Aragon, Sikapinakii Low Horn, & Emma Nishimura, to lead individual studio sessions, and to present their artistic practices in conversation together. Each Artist uses printmaking and print media as a tool for conceptual and theoretical exploration; drawing on archives and historical documents, family histories, and employing expanded ideas of processes and approach. Recognition & Repetition seminar sessions will offer an intimate look into the studios and material practices of the Lead Artists.

Schedule & Registration Links

PART 1: Artist Talks

Saturday, January 22
11am – 12:30pm MST
With Miguel A. Aragon, Sikapinakii Low Horn, and Emma Nishimura

Register here


PART 2: BIPOC Only Session

Saturday, January 22
4pm – 5pm MST
With Miguel A. Aragon, Sikapinakii Low Horn, and Emma Nishimura

Register here


PART 3: Sikapinakii Low Horn

Thursday, January 27
7pm – 8:30pm MST

Register here


PART 4: Miguel A. Aragon

Saturday, January 29
11am – 12:30pm MST

Register here


PART 5: Emma Nishimura

Saturday, January 29
2pm – 3:30pm MST

Register here

This programming is funded by the Edmonton Arts Council through the Connections and Exchanges Organizational Initiatives Grant.

About the Artists

Emma Nishimura works with a diversity of media, including printmaking, photography, sculpture and installation. Her work addresses ideas of memory and loss that are rooted within family stories and inherited narratives. Emma received her BA from the University of Guelph, and her MFA from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She has exhibited nationally and internationally at venues including, the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, ON; the Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK; the International Print Center New York, NY; and the Taimiao Art Gallery, Beijing, China. Emma’s work is in a number of public and private collections, such as the ROM, the AGO and the Library of Congress. She has received grants from the Ontario Arts Council, and won awards from Open Studio, the International Print Center New York, Art in Print, and The Print Center. She is the recipient of the Queen Sonja Print Award 2018. Emma is an Assistant Professor and the Chair of Photography, Printmaking and Publications at OCAD University.

Miguel A. Aragón (*Juárez, México) lives and works in New York City (USA) and Berlin (Germany); he is an Associate Professor in Printmaking at CUNY College of Staten Island.

Aragón has exhibited internationally at venues including the Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, Saratoga Springs, NY; Uferhallen, Berlin, Germany and The Print Center, Philadelphia, PA. His awards and residences include NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellowship; KALA Art Institute, Berkeley, CA; Zygote Press, Cleveland, OH; and Till Richter Museum, Buggenhagen, Germany. His work is held in collections including the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Museum of Mexican Art, Chicago; and Minneapolis Institute of Art. Aragón’s work has been published in A Survey of Contemporary Printmaking (Greenville, NC: Wellington B. Gray Gallery, 2012), Peenemünde Project: Geschichte wird Kunst / Imprinting History (Berlin: Edition Braus, 2017) and ¡Printing the Revolution!: The Rise and Impact of Chicano Graphics, 1965 to Now (Washington, DC: Smithsonian American Art Museum; Princeton: in association with Princeton University Press, 2020).

Blackfoot Artist, Sikapinakii Low Horn, is from the Siksika First Nation and currently lives in Mohkinstsisi to attend the University of Calgary for their Master’s of Fine Arts. As an interdisciplinary artist, they work with a variety of mixed-mediums to tell the stories of their identity, indigenous experiences, culture, languages, and stories told. Their overall practice aims to educate the non-indigenous about the Blackfoot people in hopes that it will create a comfortable setting for all. This is crucial as a young Indigenous person as they have an ingrained purpose to tell their story and the stories of their people.